Category Archives: USMC

A U.S. Marine combat warrior receives the Pulitzer for disrobing a journey from PTSD to prison

“PROSE”: “the ordinary language people use in speaking or writing.”  – Merriam Webster

The following is excerpted from C.J. Chivers’ long-form article “The Fighter,” published in the New York Times in December of 2016 and available by click below:

The Marines strode back to their patrol base, exuberant, riding the rush of having been under fire and coming out alive. This is one of war’s exhilarating drugs. It fueled backslaps and shouts. “Everyone was like highfiving and everything,” Hagglund told me. “We were the first squad in the company to get in a firefight.”

A few minutes later Hagglund was in a bunker when a Toyota pickup rushed toward the gate. It stopped short. Its occupants hopped out and retrieved a wheelbarrow from the bed. A few Afghan soldiers ran to meet them. In the wheelbarrow was a small boy who had been shot through the skull.

The bullet had struck above his left eyebrow and blown out the back of his head. But it had hit high enough that the child was still alive — unresponsive, breathing fitfully. The man pushing the wheelbarrow was his father. Siatta watched as the Marines took the child to their aid station and rested his shattered skull over a stainless steel bowl. A corpsman tried to keep what was left of his head intact by cupping it in his hands. A sandstorm had blown up, grounding the helicopter fleet. It was a few hours before an aircraft took him away. Not long after, the radio brought word. The boy had died.

Hagglund thought the child might be 4 years old. Siatta and Perez thought he might be 6. No one was exactly sure how he had been shot. . . .

. . .

Siatta was shaken. His training had not prepared him for what it felt like to look down after a gunfight upon a child with part of his head gone. “During all of our workup, shooting targets, throwing grenades, doing all that, you never once saw kids mangled,” he told me. The boy reminded him of his niece. He was one firefight into the only line of work he had ever wanted and was confronted with “one of those sights – it was like maturity overnight, a sobering.”

 

Re: U.S. Marine veteran combat warrior and his Pulitzer-awarded article “The Fighter”:

Sam Siatta was drunk when he forced his way into a house he thought was his and got into a violent fight with a stranger. Mr. Siatta was also a veteran infantry combat Marine who was struggling with adjusting to life after serving in the war in Afghanistan. C.J. Chivers, a former infantry Marine himself, won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing for telling the story of Mr. Siatta’s crime, and its aftermath, for The New York Times Magazine.

(feature image attribution: Devin Yalkin and The New York Times. 28 December 2016)

Charles Bloeser is the creator of combatresearchandprose.com, a new open-source applied research initiative that will continue to contribute to bridging the gap in experience, knowledge, and understanding that divides those who’ve never served under arms from those who have. He’s the civilian son and grandson of veterans and a lawyer who’s spent most years arguing criminal and constitutional issues in America’s state and federal trial and appellate courts. His most recent publication chronicles a tragic story that a former client asked him to tell, from his deathbed:   

http://www.strifeblog.org/2018/08/02/henry-a-wounded-soldier-forgotten-by-all-in-an-american-jail-by-all-except-his-brothers-who-fell-beside-him-in-vietnam

 

NEW FROM STRIFE BLOG and this author: Part II of Henry: a wounded soldier forgotten by all in an American jail – by all except his brothers who fell beside him in Vietnam

Strife image 397 x 397The former soldier grimaced for just an instant as he lowered himself into a Spartan metal chair opposite mine in this cramped space we shared. A chair like the one he’d lowered himself into for his monitored telephone call with his wife. Their relationship described in Hebrew scriptures as one in which they cling to each other, becoming “one flesh.” Separated here for legitimate security reasons by a thick sheet of glass.  Those of us in “the biz” prefer to call that kind of visit a “no contact visit.” It just sounds a little better than “no human touch.”

Once he was seated, Henry and I greeted each other with mutual respect, but the veteran’s words were narrow and thin. He wore a state court detainee’s bright orange coveralls. But he couldn’t fill them out.

I glanced again at the booking photograph from six months earlier.  And I looked back at this veteran. These couldn’t be the same person. They mustn’t be the same person.

Henry confirmed the basic facts that his wife had given me out in the lobby. He said he’d been arrested before. For the same thing. Henry told me it wasn’t that way before he was sent to Vietnam.

Part I

http://www.strifeblog.org/2018/08/02/henry-a-wounded-soldier-forgotten-by-all-in-an-american-jail-by-all-except-his-brothers-who-fell-beside-him-in-vietnam-part-i/

Part II

http://www.strifeblog.org/2018/08/07/henry-a-wounded-soldier-forgotten-by-all-in-an-american-jail-by-all-except-his-brothers-who-fell-beside-him-in-vietnam-part-ii/

sign-on-gate-of-kings-college-london 265About Strife

What is Strife?
“Strife is a dual format publication comprised of Strife academic blog, as well as the peer-reviewed academic journal, Strife Journal, which is published biannually. Strife is led by doctoral and graduate researchers based in the Department of War Studies, King’s College London. Our contributors come from a wide range of backgrounds including graduate and doctoral researchers, staff and faculty at King’s, and leading experts from around the world.”

 

 

 

 

ckb face indian screen image indirect 150 x 221Charles Bloeser is the creator of combatresearchandprose.com, a new open-source applied research initiative that will continue to contribute to bridging the gap in experience, knowledge, and understanding that divides those who’ve never served under arms from those who have. He’s the civilian son and grandson of veterans and a lawyer who’s spent most years arguing criminal and constitutional issues in America’s state and federal trial and appellate courts. Among his published research are works re Libyan-supported Jihadi terrorism in the Western Hemisphere, civilian-military law enforcement relations in the U.S., and the demands that an increasingly complex national security environment make for special operations forces. His research agenda includes national security/defense/veterans issues, with special attention to those facing challenges from combat stress/PTSD/TBI etc.

 

NEW FROM STRIFE BLOG and this author: Henry: a wounded soldier forgotten by all in an American jail – by all except his brothers who fell beside him in Vietnam

“But for this combat veteran’s wife, Henry was never the kind of man who could be distilled into simple words like “defendant” and “perpetrator and “abuser.” There was no black and white in being struck by a man she knew had always loved her but whose best efforts to get relief from the symptoms of war had proved little more than the American version of a snipe hunt.[v]”

Part I

http://www.strifeblog.org/2018/08/02/henry-a-wounded-soldier-forgotten-by-all-in-an-american-jail-by-all-except-his-brothers-who-fell-beside-him-in-vietnam-part-i/

Part II

http://www.strifeblog.org/2018/08/07/henry-a-wounded-soldier-forgotten-by-all-in-an-american-jail-by-all-except-his-brothers-who-fell-beside-him-in-vietnam-part-ii/

About Strife

What is Strife?
“Strife is a dual format publication comprised of Strife academic blog, as well as the peer-reviewed academic journal, Strife Journal, which is published biannually. Strife is led by doctoral and graduate researchers based in the Department of War Studies, King’s College London. Our contributors come from a wide range of backgrounds including graduate and doctoral researchers, staff and faculty at King’s, and leading experts from around the world.”

 

 

 

Charles Bloeser is the creator of combatresearchandprose.com, a new open-source applied research initiative that will continue to contribute to bridging the gap in experience, knowledge, and understanding that divides those who’ve never served under arms from those who have. He’s the civilian son and grandson of veterans and a lawyer who’s spent most years arguing criminal and constitutional issues in America’s state and federal trial and appellate courts. Among his published research are works re Libyan-supported Jihadi terrorism in the Western Hemisphere, civilian-military law enforcement relations in the U.S., and the demands that an increasingly complex national security environment make for special operations forces. His research agenda includes national security/defense/veterans issues, with special attention to those facing challenges from combat stress/PTSD/TBI etc.

4,376,852 views can’t be wrong – Hip Hop from Tech N9ne “PTSD (Warrior Built)”

“PROSE”: “the ordinary language people use in speaking or writing.” – Merriam Webster

All proceeds from the sales of the Tech N9ne and Jay Trilogy version of “P.T.S.D.” benefit the “Warrior Built” charitable organization. Founded by Nick Hamm, a former U.S. Marine, wounded in the line of combat, “Warrior Built” seeks to honor the service and sacrifice of combat veterans and wounded service members by providing vocational and recreational opportunities.https://combatresearchandprose.com/2018/07/31/4376852-views-cant-be-wrong-hip-hop-from-tech-n9ne-ptsd-warrior-built/
RETIRED U.S. MARINE 1ST SERGEANT NICK HAMM FROM TUCSON, ARIZONA (USA) STARTED WARRIOR BUILT FOUNDATION. IN THIS 45-MINUTE INTERVIEW WITH MENTORS FOR MILITARY, HE SAYS THIS: WE’RE NOT YOUR GRANDMA’S FOUNDATION.” http://www.warriorbuilt.org/mentors-military-podcast-nick-hamm/
“PTSD(WARRIOR BUILT)” SEEMS TO CONNECT: 4,376,852 views reported 28 July
More info re Warrior Built Foundationhttp://www.warriorbuilt.org/

[Feature image Tech N9ne for “PTSD (Warrior Built),” courtesy Monster Energy. https://www.monsterenergy.com/news/tech-n9ne-ptsd-exclusive-video-debut
accessed 28 July 2018.]
***
ckb face indian screen image indirect 150 x 221
Charles Bloeser is a lawyer and the researcher behind the creation of combatresearchandprose.com, a new open-source applied research initiative examining combat and those marked by it. His most recent publication, in August 2018, reports how a cancer-stricken, combat-haunted, Vietnam veteran fell between the cracks in a modern jail. It’s an account that, from that warrior’s deathbed, he asked author to share with those best able to keep the same thing from happening to others. STRIFE, at the Department of War Studies, Kings College London, gave him a way to do that.

http://www.strifeblog.org/2018/08/02/henry-a-wounded-soldier-forgotten-by-all-in-an-american-jail-by-all-except-his-brothers-who-fell-beside-him-in-vietnam

Journeyman Pictures’ Battlefield ER: The brutal life of a warzone medic

“PROSE”: “the ordinary language people use in speaking or writing.”  – Merriam Webster

 

 

U.S. troops carry a wounded Afghan National Army soldier 400 x 276
U.S. troops carry a wounded Afghan National Army soldier to a U.S. Army MEDEVAC helicopter in Qandahar, Afghanistan. (PHOTO CREDIT: Justin Sullivan/GETTY IMAGES)

“In the heart of Taliban territory, a talented and youthful team of medics race against the clock to save a constant stream of casualties, bracing themselves for the bloody consequences of the imminent ‘surge’.

“Welcome to M*A*S*H 2010, where a brave medical team are on 24 hour alert. “We’re the busiest Forward Surgical Team in Iraq and Afghanistan”. In the next moment, the alarm sounds and the medivac helicopter is taking off. “Is it a US…an Afghan…a child?”, asks the pilot, as a giant smoke cloud from an exploded mine-resistant vehicle comes into view. Two American soldiers have been killed and three wounded by an IED. All are loaded onto the helicopters and the golden hour in which they can be saved, begins…”We provide 21st century intensive care”, shouts Major Bryan over the blood-urdling screams of the injured. . . .”

The Golden Hour / Battlefield ER: The brutal life of a warzone medic. ABC Australia. (Journeyman Pictures.  December 16, 2013.) (26:42 min)

 

 

 

 

 

United-States-Marine corporal on medevac helicopter in Afghanistan. The Guardian. multi source image 300 x 230 cropped
Injured Marine Cpl. Burness Britt reacts after being lifted onto a medevac helicopter from the U.S. Army’s Task Force Lift “Dust Off,” Charlie Company 1-214 Aviation Regiment June 4, 2011. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)

No guaranteed ‘golden hour’ for Marines headed into the next big fight.”

“A lifesaving Defense Department policy that whisks wounded troops off the battlefield to lifesaving care within the first hour of injury is a luxury Marines may not have headed into the next big fight.

“The policy is credited with a near 98 percent survival rate, Rear Adm. Colin G. Chinn, Joint Staff surgeon, told audience members at a Navy medical symposium held at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, on Wednesday.

“But as the U.S. is facing more capable adversaries, it’s a promise the Defense Department no longer believes it can keep.”

Shawn Snow. “No guaranteed ‘golden hour’ for Marines headed into the next big fight.” Marinecorpstimes.com (February 15, 2018) 

https://www.marinecorpstimes.com/news/your-marine-corps/2018/02/15/no-golden-hour-for-marines-headed-into-the-next-big-fight/

 

Feature image courtesy Talking Proud Archives — Military Medevacs & Medics, Angels of Mercy. Accessed 25 July 2018

 

ckb face indian screen image indirect 150 x 221

Charles Bloeser is a lawyer and the researcher behind the creation of combatresearchandprose.com, a new open-source applied research initiative examining combat and those marked by it. His most recent publication, in August 2018, reports how a cancer-stricken, combat-haunted, Vietnam veteran fell between the cracks in a modern jail. It’s an account that, from that warrior’s deathbed, he asked author to share with those best able to keep the same thing from happening to others. STRIFE, at the Department of War Studies, Kings College London, gave him a way to do that.  

http://www.strifeblog.org/2018/08/02/henry-a-wounded-soldier-forgotten-by-all-in-an-american-jail-by-all-except-his-brothers-who-fell-beside-him-in-vietnam

 

 

CBS Sunday Morning interviews reluctant MoH warrior who urged, “Dear Fellow Veterans: tell your war stories.”

“PROSE”: “the ordinary language people use in speaking or writing.”  – Merriam Webster

The battle at Combat Outpost Keating remains one of the deadliest attacks on U.S. forces since the beginning of the war in Afghanistan — and it is the first battle to produce two Medal of Honor recipients since the Battle of Mogadishu almost 20 years ago. . . .

“At least nine other soldiers from B Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, at Fort Carson, Colo., have been awarded the Silver Star, the nation’s third-highest award for valor, for their actions at COP Keating.”  MilitaryTimes.com 5 August 2013.

(Clinton Romesha is a former Army staff sergeant and author of “Red Platoon: A True Story of American Valor.” He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions during the defense of Combat Outpost Keating. This excerpt is from Sgt. Romesha’s May 29, 2016 opinion piece in the Washington Post.)

. . .

In October 2009, my cavalry troop was preparing to shut down a remote outpost in Afghanistan when we were assaulted by more than 300 Taliban-led insurgents. In violation of the most basic principles of warfare, our base, Combat Outpost Keating, had been built in a valley surrounded by three mountains. It is almost impossible to hold and defend your ground when the enemy is free to shoot from above while observing every move you make.

Within the first hour of the attack, the insurgents had breached our wire, driving most of Keating’s 50 U.S. guardians into our final defensive formation inside a cluster of three hard-shelled buildings, known as the Alamo position.

It was then that five enlisted men volunteered to join me in a counterattack meant to drive the enemy back beyond the wire, rescue missing comrades and retrieve the bodies of our dead.

During the next several hours, we achieved these goals. But by the time the battle was over, we’d lost eight men. Three days later, we were evacuated, and the outpost was leveled by a series of American Hellfire missiles.

As far as the Army was concerned, that was the end of Keating’s story. But the men who fought saw things differently.

How do you consecrate the memory of your fallen when the place where they lost their lives is off-limits, terrain to which you may never return?

Generally, soldiers don’t like to talk about their most painful experiences. Most combat veterans have shorthand, watered-down versions of what happened to us that we recite, politely and dutifully, when asked. The real stories are almost never shared.

For the most part, we prefer to keep those memories safely locked away.

Why? For one, because language is such an imperfect tool. Anyone who has survived combat knows that words are entirely incapable of conveying the horrors of battle. Soldiers assume that any attempt to communicate such truths will merely underscore the futility of trying. This creates its own kind of defeat, another loss to be added to the balance sheet.

I cannot speak for every soldier. But this has been true for me and the men who fought by my side. And something else I know: Our tour in Afghanistan left a hole in all of us — a hole we weren’t able to identify, much less repair, because the Army had done almost nothing to prepare us for it.

We were given exhaustive training for the tasks set before us as soldiers. But when it came to coping with challenges after we came home, we were provided almost no resources.

This may have been the central insight — dimly realized and barely articulated — that led a group of us to conclude that if there were a path forward through the thickets of grief and loss, we would have to create it ourselves.

And that is how we decided we needed to tell our story.

By “our” story, I don’t simply mean what happened at Keating. The most vital component was building a testament to the men who did not come back. Who they were. How they died. And to the extent possible, measuring whether their deaths held meaning, given that their lives were sacrificed for an outpost that probably never should have been built.

[end of excerpt]

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/dear-fellow-veterans-tell-your-war-stories/2016/05/29/ead52246-211e-11e6-9e7f-57890b612299_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.c414a263595f

 

Courage at Keating: Second MoH, 9 Silver Stars for standout B Troop

https://www.militarytimes.com/2013/08/05/courage-at-keating-second-moh-9-silver-stars-for-standout-b-troop/

        Army.Mil Medal of Honor Page for US Army SSGT Clinton Romesha:

https://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/romesha/

        Army.Mil Medal of Honor Page for US Army SSGT Ty Carter:

https://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/carter/

Developing list of writing opportunities and resources for current and past military service members at combatresearchandprose.com:

https://combatresearchandprose.com/combat-research-and-prose-where-warriors-write/

 

PLEASE NOTE: This website template unacceptably crops the CENTCOM graphic that appears as the “feature image” for this post, resulting in the exclusion of the locations and means by which three more soldiers fell at COP Keating on 3 Oct. 2009. Here’s the complete list: Sgt. Joshua T. Kirk, 30, of South Portland, Maine;  Staff Sgt. Justin T. Gallegos, 27, of Tucson, Ariz.; Staff Sgt. Vernon W. Martin, 25, Savannah, Ga.; Sgt. Joshua M. Hardt, 24, Applegate, Calif.; Sgt. Michael P. Scusa, 22, Villas, N.J.; Spc. Christopher T. Griffin, 24, Kincheloe, Mich.; Spc. Stephan L. Mace, 21, Lovettsville, Va.; and Pfc. Kevin C. Thomson, 22, Reno, Nev. And here’s the complete graphic:

CENTCOM image re 3 October 2009 Taliban attack at COP Keating 700 x 631

 

 

ckb face indian screen image indirect 150 x 221Charles Bloeser is a lawyer and the researcher behind the creation of combatresearchandprose.com, a new open-source applied research initiative examining combat and those marked by it. His most recent publication, in August 2018, reports how a cancer-stricken, combat-haunted, Vietnam veteran fell between the cracks in a modern jail. It’s an account that, from that warrior’s deathbed, he asked author to share with those best able to keep the same thing from happening to others. STRIFE, at the Department of War Studies, Kings College London, gave him a way to do that.  

http://www.strifeblog.org/2018/08/02/henry-a-wounded-soldier-forgotten-by-all-in-an-american-jail-by-all-except-his-brothers-who-fell-beside-him-in-vietnam

 

Declassified World War II escape and evasion record prompts forthcoming examination of combat trauma among Allied airmen flying bombing runs over occupied Europe.

“PROSE”: “the ordinary language people use in speaking or writing.”  – Merriam Webster

Here’s an excerpt from the forthcoming article. It draws from a 2016 trauma medicine article by a decorated 24-year U.S. Navy veteran who served as a combat doctor in Afghanistan and Iraq.  In this excerpt, the trauma surgeon and his colleagues explain why a high-velocity round from a rifle such as the AK47, M4, and AR15, does vastly more damage to the human body than Hollywood’s led us to believe.

“Allied airmen who were lucky enough to make it back to Britain often had combat injuries that current day civilians in much of the world never encounter. Injuries that we cannot imagine but which all the time send our warriors back to us broken in part or in whole. Injuries that far too often send the ones we love back to us in boxes draped in our nations’ colors.

“Modern warfare is a lazy Susan, overstuffed with both new and old ways to kill. Each turn of the wheel and selection of another weapon lengthens the types and severities of the combat wounds that stow away in returning service members and then refuse to leave once those warriors get home.

“Writing in a 2005 article in Techniques in Orthopaedics, Montreal-born Dr. Richard Gosselin explains that when it comes to combat injuries, things are seldom as good as they look. “War wounds are often worse than they appear. High-energy projectiles, deep penetration of foreign material, dirty field conditions, delayed evacuation, and/or ill-advised initial treatment such as prolonged use of tourniquet or primary wound closure may all contribute to wounds with extensive tissue damage and severe contamination. Unless evacuation time is short, which for civilians is usually the exception, life-threatening injuries will have already self-triaged[i]

 

Screen-Shot-2015-11-18. Exit wound from M4 round. SOFREP article by Dr. Dan Pronk. TacMed Australia. 375 x 250
exit wound caused by high-energy round fired by an M-4. photo taken by Dr. Dan Pronk, former special operations doctor with the Australian Armed Forces. from December 19, 2015 SOFREP article “Why I’d Rather be Shot with an AK-47 Than an M4.  https://sofrep.com/45197/why-id-rather-be-shot-by-an-ak47-than-an-m4/

“Maybe a comparison of two injuries caused by two very different firearms can make it easier to imagine something of what those we send to fight for us often have to go through. Forensic surgeon Bill Smock explained in a recent interview that “If a bullet from a handgun strikes a liver, it injures the organ by poking a hole and causing tissue disruption around the path of the bullet. More specifically, a 9-millimeter handgun creates a hole that disrupts three-quarters of an inch around the bullets path, . . .”

 “. . .But with a rifle round, you have massive tissue disruption,’ Smock said. Rather than three quarters of an inch around the wound path, it is disrupted three to four inches around that same tissue.’”[ii]

 “Peter M. Rhee, a decorated 24-year U.S. Navy veteran and a combat doctor in Afghanistan and Iraq, and his colleagues explain in a 2016 article in the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery why there’s so much destruction to the human body when it’s entered by a high-velocity round from a rifle such as the AK47, M4, and AR15:

 “Lacerating and Crushing

 “. . . high energy rounds may begin to tumble as energy is dissipated upon travel through deeper tissue. The natural tendency is that the high-energy bullets will become unstable as they decelerate. These bullets may pitch and yaw, and the back end of the bullet may become the leading edge. During this distance, the energy of the projectile is absorbed by the surrounding tissue, causing stretching and tearing of tissue.”[iii]

“Cavitation

 “Illustrated by a color photograph of a surgeon’s hand sticking through a gunshot wound in someone’s neck, the former U.S. Navy combat doctor puts it this way: “A bullet with sufficient energy will have a cavitation effect in addition to the penetrating track injury. As the bullet passes through the tissue, initially crushing then lacerating, the space left by the tissue forms a cavity, and this is called the permanent cavity. Higher-velocity bullets create a pressure wave that forces the tissues away, creating not only a permanent cavity the size of the caliber of the bullet but also a temporary cavity or secondary cavity, which is often many times larger than the bullet itself.”[iv]

“Lest we forget: the rounds that German fighters used to down Allied bombers and then their airmen descending by parachute, those rounds were designed to kill airplanes.[v]

 

[i] Richard A. Gosselin, M.D., M.P.H., F.R.C.S.(C).  War Injuries, Trauma, and Disaster Relief. Techniques in Orthopaedics 20(2):97, 99. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 2005.

[ii] “What a bullet does to a human body. PBS NewsHour. Feb. 17, 2018. https://www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/what-a-bullet-does-to-a-human-body

[iii] Peter M. Rhee, MD, MPH, Ernest E. Moore, MD, Bellal Joseph, MD, Andrew Tang, MD, Viraj Pandit, MD, and Gary Vercruysse, MD. Gunshot wounds: A review of ballistics, bullets, weapons, and myths. Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery 80(6): 853, 863 and Figure 13 A, B. Wolters Kluwer Health 2016.

[iv] Id. at 863.

[v] Re: German Luftwaffe ammo during WWII: http://www.inert-ord.net/luft02h/index.html

(END OF EXCERPT)

* * *

Author Link:

https://combatresearchandprose.com/about-this-researcher/

https://www.linkedin.com/in/charlesbloeser/

(Photo: Wee Willie, Boeing B-17G-15-BO Flying Fortress 42-31333, is going down after hit by antiaircraft artillery over Stendal, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany, 8 April 1945. (U.S.A.F.); Accessed at thisdayinaviation.com March 12, 2018).

 

ckb face indian screen image indirect 150 x 221Charles Bloeser is a lawyer and the researcher behind the creation of combatresearchandprose.com, a new open-source applied research initiative examining combat and those marked by it. His most recent publication, in August 2018, reports how a cancer-stricken, combat-haunted, Vietnam veteran fell between the cracks in a modern jail. It’s an account that, from that warrior’s deathbed, he asked author to share with those best able to keep the same thing from happening to others. STRIFE, at the Department of War Studies, Kings College London, gave him a way to do that.  

http://www.strifeblog.org/2018/08/02/henry-a-wounded-soldier-forgotten-by-all-in-an-american-jail-by-all-except-his-brothers-who-fell-beside-him-in-vietnam